Handbook of Intervention and Alzheimer’s Disease

Editors

Raji, C.A.,
Leng, Y.,
Ashford, J.W.,
Khalsa, D.S.

Publication date

# of pages

766

Cover

Softcover

ISBN print

978-1-64368-500-7

ISBN online

978-1-64368-501-4

Subjects

This Book Contains A Subject Index

Description

It is almost 120 years since Alzheimer’s disease (AD) was first reported, and the concept of managing some of the modifiable risk factors associated with the disease has been present from the outset. Intervening to manage risk factors as a way of tackling AD is not new, but optimizing brain health as a way of minimizing risk and maximizing the potential benefits of revolutionary new treatments for AD is becoming increasingly important.

This book, the Handbook of Intervention and Alzheimer’s Disease, presents 47 papers exploring factors which may either inspire or inform future treatment and clinical trials. While novel interventions such as anti-amyloid immunotherapy present great opportunities, they may also increase the risk of brain bleeds and edema, which in turn may lead to adverse clinical outcomes. Such adverse outcomes are demonstrably more likely to occur in persons with poor brain health, so improved management of the risk factors which make up the AD preventome will also minimize the risks associated with such novel therapies. The papers in this volume can therefore be thought of as offering insight into those factors that can optimize brain health or providing key insights into interventions which may achieve such outcomes.

Together with its companion volume on prevention, the book provides a comprehensive overview of strategies for tackling Alzheimer’s disease, and will be of interest to all those working in the field.

Cover illustration:
Improved hypoperfusion (resolving blue colors) on ASL MRI Z-score maps superimposed on structural MRI scans at baseline and one year in a PET amyloid-positive research participant with cognitive complaints undergoing one year of multi-domain personalized brain health interventions (vascular disease management, dietary optimization, sustained physical activity etc.). Permission to use this figure was granted both by the study P.I. Dr. David Merrill, MD, PhD, of the Pacific Neuroscience Institute and the research participant.

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