*This journal is a continuation of Nutrition and Aging, volumes 1-4 can be found here

Nutrition and Healthy Aging

CiteScore
2023
2.0

Volume

9, 1 issues

Latest issue

9:1 online 09 January 2024

Next issue

10:1 scheduled for January 2025

Back volumes

From volume 4, 2016

ISSN print

2451-9502

ISSN online

2451-9480
Open Access
Online Only

Aims & Scope

Nutrition and Healthy Aging is an international forum for research on nutrition as a means of promoting healthy aging. It is particularly concerned with the impact of nutritional interventions on the metabolic and molecular mechanisms which modulate aging and age-associated diseases, including both biological responses on the part of the organism itself and its micro biome. Results emanating from both model organisms and clinical trials are considered. With regards to the latter, the journal is rigorous in only accepting for publication well controlled, randomized human intervention trials that conform broadly with the current EFSA and US FDA guidelines for nutritional clinical studies. The journal publishes research articles, short communications, critical reviews and conference summaries, whilst open peer commentaries are welcomed.

Editorial Board

Editors-in-Chief

Luigi Fontana, MD, PhD (Dietary Restriction and Exercise Training in Healthy Aging)
Professor of Medicine and Nutrition
Leonard P Ullmann Chair in Translational Metabolic Health
The University of Sydney

Australia
Email: editorial@iospress.nl

Prof. Dr. Jeremy P.E. Spencer (Flavanoids, Polyphenols, Mechanisms of Action, Neurodegeneration, Cognition, Cardiovascular Disease)
Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences
Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics
University of Reading

Berkshire, UK
Email: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

Britt Burton-Freeman, PhD, MS (Diet and Cardiometabolic Risk, Obesity and Body Weight Regulation)
Director, Center for Nutrition Research
Institute for Food Safety and Health
Illinois Institute of Technology

6502 South Archer Rd.
Bedford Park, IL 60501-1957, USA

Email: bburton@iit.edu

and

Associate Research Nutritionist
Department of Nutrition
University of California

Davis, CA, USA
Email: bbfreeman@ucdavis.edu

Associate Editors

Bahram Arjmandi, PhD, RD (Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis, Cholesterol, Functional Foods)
Department of Nutrition, Food & Exercise Sciences, Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL, USA

Rozalyn Anderson, PhD (Caloric Restriction Age-Associated Illnesses, Molecular Biology Studies on Postmitotic Tissues, including Adipose Tissue, Liver, Skeletal Suscles and the Brain)
Institute on Aging, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin
Madison, WI, USA

Holly M. Brown-Borg, PhD (Hormonal Pathways and Mechanisms that Delay Aging. Current studies focus on relationship between Epigenetic Signature, Cellular Metabolism, Hormones, Mitochondrial Activities and Aging in various Mouse Strains of Extended and Shortened Life Spans)
Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics, University of North Dakota
Grand Forks, ND, USA

Sean P. Curran, PhD (Genetics to predict which diets are ideal for a healthy life)
Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California
Los Angeles, USA

Indika Edirisinghe, PhD (Clinical Nutrition Research Center/Department of Food Science and Nutrition) 
Illinois Institute of Technology
Chicago, IL, USA

Michael Fenech, PhD (Impact of Nutrition, Lifestyle and Psychological Stress on Chromosomal Instability and Telomere Integrity, Personalised Nutrition for Diabetes and Dementia Prevention and Cancer Growth Control and Biomarkers of Healthy Ageing) 
Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia
Adelaide, Australia

Chris Gill, PhD (Reviews Editor) (Human Digestion Dietary Phytochemicals (Terrestrial/Marine) Pre/Probiotics, the Role of Colonic Microbiota on Gut Health, Gastrointestinal tract Epidemiology Research methodologies)
Northern Ireland Centre for Food and Health / School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster
Belfast, Northern Ireland

Sarah A. Johnson, PhD, RDN (Dietary polyphenols/flavanoids and cardiovascular diseases, microbiome and health)
Functional Foods & Human Health Laboratory, College of Health and Human Sciences, Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO, USA

Dudley Lamming, PhD (Reviews Editor) (mTOR biology in yeast, worms, flies, and mice; as well as the interaction between dietary amino acids, metabolism, and longevity)
Lamming Laboratory for the Molecular Physiology of Aging, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin
Madison, WI, USA

Dan Lamport, PhD (Nutrition and Cognition; Type 2 Diabetes, Obesity and Neuropsychological function)
School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading
Reading, UK

Anis Larbı, PhD (Immune Robustness and Healthspan by combining Molecular, Immunological and Metabolomic studies in clinically well-characterized elderly individuals. Intervention studies in humans and mice models are part of the Aging Program)
Aging Program, Singapore Immunology Network, Agency for Science, Technology and Research
Singapore

Mary Ann Lila, PhD (Anthocyanin and its dietary sources: Blueberries, Black Currants, Cranberries, and other Berries)
Food Bioprocessing & Nutrition Sciences, Plants for Human Health Institute, North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC, USA

James Mitchell, PhD (Mechanism of Dietary Restriction)
Department of Molecular Metabolism, School of Public Health, Harvard University
Boston, MA, USA

Catarina Rendeiro (Nutritional Sciences, School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences)
 University of Birmingham
Birmingham, UK

Federico E. Rey (Gut Microbial Metabolism of specific dietary components (e.g., Choline, Flavonoids) can impact Cardiovascular Diseases. Uses Gnotobiotic mouse models of Cardiovascular Disease, Bacterial Genetics, transcriptional profiling and Metabolomics.)
Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI, USA

Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD (Age-related Behavioral, Cognition and Motor Performance and Neurochemical Changes and Nutritional Treatments)
USDA, Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University
Boston, MA, USA

Sandrine Thuret, PhD (Effect of Diet on Age-related Changes in Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Health and Disease, Alzheimer’s and depression)
Adult Neurogenesis & Mental Health Laboratory, King’s College London
London, UK

David Vauzour, PhD (Neurodegenerative Disorders, Phytochemicals, Neuroinflammation, Memory, Learning and Neuro-Cognitive Performances, Molecular Mechanisms, Association between the APOE4 Genotype and Chronic Disease Risk.)
Molecular Nutrition, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia
Norwich, UK

Meng Wang, PhD (Age-associated changes in Endocrine Organs, their Genetic causes and their impacts on Healthspan and Lifespan in C. Elegans, with focuses on Lipid Metabolism, Germline Stem Cell Homeostasis and Neuroendocrine Regulation.)
Huffington Center On Aging, Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX, USA

Editor Clinical Trials Corner

Leonie K. Heilbronn, PhD (Metabolism and Aging)
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide
Adelaide, Australia

Social Media Editor

Maria L Cagigas, PhD.
University of Sydney 
Sydney, Australia

Editorial Board

Andrzej Bartke, PhD (Endocrinology, Aging, and Longevity)
Internal Medicine and Physiology, School of Medicine, Southern Illinois University
Springfield, IL, USA

Nir Barzilai, MD (Aging Research, Longevity, and Genetics)
Institute for Aging Research / Department of Medicine (Endocrinology), Albert Einstein College of Medicine
New York, NY, USA

Maurizio Battino, PhD (Nutritional Biochemistry)
Department of Odontostomatologic and Specialized Clinical Sciences, Marche Polytechnic University
Ancona, Italy 

Maria Blasco, PhD (Telomeres and Telomerase, Cancer Biology)
Telomeres and Telomerase Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center
Madrid, Spain

Anne Brunet, PhD (Molecular Genetics and Aging)
The Burnet Lab, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University
San Francisco, CA, USA

Rafael de Cabo, PhD (Aging and Caloric Restriction)
Translational Gerontology Branch, National Institute On Aging
Bethesda, MD, USA

Kristi M. Crowe-White, PhD, RD (Cardiovascular Nutrition, Cardiometabolic Disease, Functional Foods, Bioactive Food Compounds)
Department of Human Nutrition, University of AlabamaTuscaloosa
AL, USA

Vishwa Deep Dixit, DVM, PhD (Immunometabolism and Aging)
Immunobiology, Yale Center for Research on Aging, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University
New Haven, CT, USA

David Gems, PhD (Aging, Genetics, and Biogerontology)
Institute of Healthy Ageing, Division of Biosciences, University College London
London, UK

Malene Hansen, PhD (Autophagy and Cellular Homeostasis)
Center for Genetic Disorders and Aging Research, Sanford Burnham Prebys
San Diego, CA, USA

Tamas L. Horvath, DVM, PhD (Neuroendocrinology and Aging)
Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism, Department of Comparative Medicine, Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT, USA

Donald K. Ingram, PhD (Gerontology and Caloric Restriction)
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA, USA

Matt Kaeberlein, PhD (Molecular Genetics of Aging)
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Washington
Seattle, WA, USA

Cynthia Kenyon, PhD (Molecular Biology and Aging)
UCSF, Clinical and Translational Science Institute / Calico Life Sciences
San Francisco, CA, USA

Samuel Klein, MD (Nutrition, Metabolism, and Aging)
Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science, Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO, USA

John J. Kopchick, PhD (Growth Hormone and Aging)
Molecular Biology, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University
Athens, OH, USA

Bruce S. Kristal, PhD (Metabolomics and Aging)
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Medicine, Harvard Catalyst
Boston, MA, USA

Christiaan Leeuwenburgh, PhD (Department Of Physiology And Aging, University of Florida)
Department Of Physiology And Aging, University of Florida
Gainsville, FL, USA

Valter D. Longo, PhD (Fasting, Caloric Restriction, and Aging)
USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Hildegard Mack (Aging and Longevity)
Institute for Biomedical Aging Research, University of Innsbruck
Innsbruck, Austria

Frank Madeo, PhD (Cell Biology and Aging)
Institute of Molecular Biosciences, University of Graz
Graz, Austria

William Mair, PhD (Systems Biology of Aging)
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University
Boston, MA, USA

Mark Mattson, PhD (Neuroscience and Aging)
NIH Intramural Research Program
Baltimore, USA

Dragan Milenkovic, PhD (bioactive plant compounds, polyphenols)
University of California, Davis
CA, USA

Christine Morand, PhD (Nutrition and Aging)
Diet, Plant food bioactives & Vascular Health research group (NutriVasc), INRAE
Paris, France

James F. Nelson, PhD (Genetics and Aging)
Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center
San Antonio, TX, USA

Janko Nikolich-Žugich, MD, PhD (Immunology and Aging)
Department of Immunobiology, Arizona Center on Aging, University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ, USA

Susan Ozanne, PhD (Developmental Origins of Health and Disease)
MRC Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge
Cambridge, UK

Linda Partridge, D.Phil (Evolutionary Biology and Aging)
UCL Division of Biosciences, Division of Biosciences
London, UK

Pier Giuseppe Pelicci, MD, PhD (Molecular Oncology and Aging)
Research and Technology, Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare
Milan, Italy

Matthew Piper (Aging and Yeast Genetics)
Nutritional Physiology and Ageing Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University
Melbourne, Australia

Thomas Rando, MD, PhD (Stem Cell Biology and Aging)
Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Bio-X Affiliated Faculty, Stanford University
San Francisco, CA, USA

Eric Ravussin, PhD (Obesity, Metabolism, and Aging)
Nutrition Obesity, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA, USA

Holly van Remmen, PhD (Free Radicals and Aging)
Aging & Metabolism Research Program, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation,
Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Ana Rodriguez-Mateos, PhD (Nutrition and Vascular Aging)
Department of Nutritional Sciences, King's College London
London, UK

Paolo Sassone-Corsi, PhD (Epigenetics and Circadian Rhythms)
Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, School of Medicine, University of California Irvine
Irvine, CA, USA

Stephen Simpson, PhD (Ecology and Aging)
Charles Perkins Centre, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney
Sydney, Australia

David Sinclair, PhD (Genetics and Aging, Sirtuins)
Department of Genetics, Center for Biology of Aging Research, Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA, USA

Eline Slagboom, PhD (Genetics of Aging and Longevity)
Molecular Epidemiology, Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Leiden University Medical Center
Leiden, The Netherlands

John R. Speakman, PhD, DSc (Energy Metabolism and Aging)
School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK
Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

Yousin Suh, PhD (Mitochondrial Biology and Aging)
Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
New York, NY, USA

Nektarios Tavernarakis, PhD (Cell Death and Aging)
Molecular Systems Biology at the Medical School, Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Crete
Heraklion, Greece

Eric Verdin, MD (Aging, Metabolism, and Epigenetics)
Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease/Department of Medicine, UCSF Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program
San Francisco, CA, USA

Richard Weindruch, PhD (Caloric Restriction and Aging)
Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI, USA

Craig Willcox, PhD (Genetics and Lifestyle in Healthy Aging and Longevity)
Public Health and Gerontology, Okinawa International University
Okinawa, Japan

Author Guidelines

SUBMISSION OF MANUSCRIPT

By submitting my article to this journal, I agree to the Author Copyright Agreement, the IOS Press Ethics Policy, and the IOS Press Privacy Policy.

Authors are requested to submit their manuscript electronically to the journal’s editorial management system.
Note that the manuscript should be uploaded as one file with tables and figures included. This file can be a Word document, a PDF, or a zip file.

Required files
After the article has been accepted, the following electronic files are required:
1. a word processor file of the text, such as Word or LateX (If using LaTeX, please use the standard article.sty as a style file and also send a pdf version of the LaTeX file)
2. separate files of all figures (if any); see "Preparation of manuscripts" for the required file formats.

SUBMISSION OF MANUSCRIPTS: AUTHOR INSTRUCTIONS

These policies and instructions are updated regularly (last updated August 2022) to reflect changes in guidelines so authors are encouraged to check these before submission. New manuscripts are expected to comply with the current guidelines posted on the website. Operationally, there will be a lag period for implementation of new guidelines in the published papers.

Authors are requested to submit their manuscript electronically to the journal’s editorial management system.

Note that the manuscript should be uploaded as one Word document, including title page, body of text (divided by subheadings), Acknowledgments, Funding, Author Contributions, Conflict of Interest, and References. A supplemental file, such as a video can also to be included, accompanying the submission. If the file is too large to submit, please contact editorial@iospress.com to arrange a file transfer. For further information, see “Supplementary Data” below.

Resubmissions should clearly mention that the submission is a revision and include the reference number in the submission letter. The author's replies to the reviewer comments should be included in the revised manuscript itself (at the top). The revised paper should always be a Word document. Manuscripts not revised within 6 months of first submission will generally be considered as new submissions and re-refereed accordingly.

Submission of an article is understood to imply that the article is original and unpublished and is not being considered for publication elsewhere. Nutrition and Healthy Aging is committed to the highest ethical standards and best practices in publishing and follows the code of conduct of the Committee on Publication Ethics and the ICMJE. Any possible conflict of interest, financial or otherwise, of relevance to the submitted work must be clearly indicated in the manuscript (for further details see our Policy on Conflicts of Interest). Procedures involving experiments on human subjects should be in accord with the ethical standards of the Committee on Human Experimentation of the institution in which the experiments were done or in accord with the Helsinki Declaration as revised in 2013 (for further details see our Policy on Use of Human Subjects). Procedures involving experimentation on animal subjects should be in accord with either the guide of the institution in which the experiments were done, or with the National Research Council’s guide for the care and use of laboratory animals (for further details see our Policy on Use of Animals).

If the address to which proofs should be sent is different from the correspondence address, authors are kindly requested to indicate this. Both the Editors-in-Chief and the publisher should be informed of any changes in either or both of these addresses. Please also supply a direct telephone number and email address, if available.

Preparation of manuscripts

Organization and style of presentation
Manuscripts must be written in English. Authors whose native language is not English are recommended to seek the advice of a native English speaker, if possible, before submitting their manuscripts. 

Manuscripts should be double spaced throughout with wide margins (2.5cm or 1in), including the abstract and references. Every page of the manuscript, including the title page, references, tables, etc., should include a page number centered at the bottom.

Manuscripts should be organized in the following order with headings and subheadings typed on a separate line, without indentation. 

Title Page

  1. Title (should be clear, descriptive and concise).
  2. Full name(s) of author(s).
    All authors should meet the following 4 criteria: (a) have made substantial contributions to the work, (conception, performance or interpretation of data); (b) writing the article; (c) approve the final version to be published; (d) agreed to be accountable for the accuracy and integrity of the work. 
    Authors are encouraged to include their ORCID identifiers.
  3. Full affiliation(s). Delineate affiliations with lowercase letters.
  4. Present address of author(s), if different from affiliation.
  5. Running title (45 characters or less, including spaces).
  6. Complete correspondence address, including telephone number and email address.

Leave the author information blank if double-blind peer review is wished for, but do include the information in the submission letter to the editor.

Abstract and Keywords
The abstract for research papers should follow the “structured abstract” format:
BACKGROUND:
OBJECTIVE:
METHODS:
RESULTS:
CONCLUSIONS:
The abstract should try to be no longer than 250 words. 
For other papers such as Reviews, the abstract should be clear, descriptive, and self-explanatory, and no longer than 250 words.
Include a list of 4-10 keywords. These keywords should be terms from the 
MeSH database.
The abstract should make clear the context and aims for the study.  It should also state how it was conducted, the main findings and conclusions drawn. Clinical trials should list the NCT number, and include in the abstract items deemed essential by the CONSORT group.

Introduction
This should outline the context for and purpose of the study.

Materials and Methods
There is no word limit to the materials and methods section, as the journal’s policy is that methodological rigor and reproducibility is of great importance. This section should aim to be sufficiently detailed to enable others with access to the data to reproduce the results.

Informed consent
For research involving human subjects, including registry reviews and retrospective cohort studies for example, authors must state that informed signed consent has been obtained from all subjects or provide an explanation as to why consent was waived. However, because of the legacy pipeline after introduction of this policy.

Ethical considerations, compliance and protocol approval
Compliance with guidelines on human experimentation as well as protocol approval by a local Institutional Review Board should be stated and the approval number should be provided.

Compliance with guidelines on animal experimentation as well as protocol approval by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee should be stated and the approval number should be provided.

Clinical trials should include the full protocol as a supplement. Studies involving human subjects that are exempt from approval by an Institutional Review Board and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee should mention this in an Ethical Considerations Statement. 

Guidelines

Where applicable, include a statement of compliance with guidelines, and a flow chart, for respectively

Cell line identity 
In keeping with scientific consensus guidelines, Nutrition and Healthy Aging considers it to be good practice for cultured cell lines to be authenticated. For each cell line, authors should include in the Methods section a statement that specifies:

  1. Source of the cell lines
  2. Are any cell lines used in this paper listed in the database of commonly misidentified cell lines maintained by the International Cell Line Authentication Committee (ICLAC)? If yes, include in the Methods section a scientific justification of their use
  3. If the cell lines been authenticated and by which method
  4. If the cell lines been tested for mycoplasma contamination and if so, date last tested.

Microarray Data
The Journal has adopted the microarray data standard developed by the Microarray Gene Expression Data Society (MGED), requiring that all authors using microarray data analysis in their research submit a complete data set to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene Expression Omnibus database (GEO; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) prior to manuscript submission. Papers submitted to the Journal that use microarray data analysis must comply with the “minimum information about microarray experiments” (MIAME) standard. Access to the GEO database is free and open for all, and the database is maintained by NCBI (Cheadle C, Cho-Chung YS, Becker KG, and Vawter MP. Application of z-score transformation to Affymetrix data. Appl Bioinformatics. 2003; 2(4): 209-217.)

Results
These should be presented in a logical order and summarize the salient findings.

Discussion
This should link the conclusions with the aims of the study but avoid conclusions not adequately supported by the data.

Acknowledgments
If there are none, do still include this section and insert "The authors have no acknowledgments".
Authors acknowledging individuals should include a letter from the individual(s) providing written permission for this acknowledgment.

Funding
Specify sources of funding.
If there are none, do still include this section and insert "The authors report no funding".

Author Contributions
For every author, his or her contribution to the manuscript needs to be provided using the following categories: conception; performance of work; or interpretation of data; writing the article. All authors should also state whether they had access to the data. Please read the IOS Press authorship policy for further information.

Conflict of Interest
If there is no conflict of interest to declare, do still include this section and insert "The authors have no conflict of interest to report". If an author is also on the Editorial Board of this journal, the following statement should be included in this section: “<AUTHOR> is an Editorial Board Member of this journal, but was not involved in the peer-review process nor had access to any information regarding its peer-review.’’

References
Place citations as numbers in square brackets in the text. All publications cited in the text should be presented in a list of references following the text of the manuscript. Only articles published or accepted for publication should be listed in the reference list. Submitted articles can be listed in the text as (author(s), unpublished data).
- All authors should be listed in the reference list.
- References must be listed in Vancouver style:
[1] Rose ME, Huerbin MB, Melick J, Marion DW, Palmer AM, Schiding JK, Kochanek PM, Graham SH. Regulation of interstitial excitatory amino acid concentrations after cortical contusion injury. Brain Res. 2002; 935(12): 406.
[2] Murray PR, Rosenthal KS, Kobayashi GS, Pfaller MA. Medical microbiology. 4th ed. St. Louis: Mosby; 2002.
[3] Berkow R, Fletcher AJ, editors. The Merck manual of diagnosis and therapy. 16th ed. Rahway (NJ): Merck Research Laboratories; 1992.
[4] Meltzer PS, Kallioniemi A, Trent JM. Chromosome alterations in human solid tumors. In: Vogelstein B, Kinzler KW, editors. The genetic basis of human cancer. New York: McGrawHill; 2002. p. 93113.
[5] Canadian Cancer Society [homepage on the Internet]. Toronto: The Society; 2006 [updated 2006 May 12; cited 2006 Oct 17]. Available from: 
https://www.cancer.ca/.

Tables
Number according to their sequence in the text. The text should include references to all tables.
- Provide each table on a separate page of the manuscript after the references.
- Include a brief and self-explanatory title with any explanations essential to the understanding of the table given in footnotes at the bottom of the table.
- Vertical lines should not be used to separate columns. Leave some extra space between the columns instead.

Figure Legends

Figures
Number the figures according to their sequence in the text. The text should include references to all figures.
- Figures should preferably be formatted in TIF or EPS format. JPG is also acceptable.
- Figures should be designed with the format of JPD in mind and preferable sized as they will appear when printed. A single column of the journal is 77mm and two columns are 165mm.
- Figures should be at 300 dpi or higher and be cropped to include the figure only (no blank space). CMYK is preferred for color figures.
- On figures where a scale is needed, use bar scales to avoid problems if the figure needs to be reduced.
- Each illustration should have a brief self-explanatory legend that should be typed separately from the figure in the section of the manuscript following the tables.
- Costs for color figures in the print version of the journal are as follows: 1 figure - 650 euro; 2 figures - 900 euro; 3 figures - 1050 euro; 4 figures - 1200 euro; 5 figures - 1350 euro. Cost for each additional color figure will be 150 euro. Color figures are free in the electronic version of the journal. You may opt to send in both black/white figures for print, and color figures for the online PDF (please adjust the figure legend appropriately). Figures will always appear in grey-scale in proofs.

Supplementary Data.

We encourage authors to make their data publicly available. Supplementary data can be submitted with the manuscript, included within the manuscript after the Figures and Tables (or otherwise after the References). Each supplementary item should have a legend and should not exceed the file size of 10 MB. Supplemental videos can be submitted separately (see top of page for submission guidelines of videos). A short description of the supplementary items should be included under the header of “Supplementary Material” within the manuscript before the “References”. Large datasets should be hosted on the author’s own or institute’s website or in an appropriate database, and should be properly cited within the manuscript.

Reviews

Reviews should be authoritative and topical and provide comprehensive and balanced coverage of a timely and/or controversial issue. Reviews should be prepared as detailed above for a Research Report, omitting Introduction through Discussion, and include a conclusion. When possible, systematic reviews are strongly encouraged and will be given stronger consideration for publication. For systematic reviews, authors should consult PRISMA and prepare their reviews as per the "PRISMA 2009 Checklist document" at this site and this compliance stated in the manuscript. Title of the review should be in the following format "SYSTEMATIC REVIEW: full article title.

Short Communications

A short communication is an article of original scholarship of unusual interest of less than 1500 words (not including references). An abstract of 100 words or less should be included with no subdivison of text into sections. References should be formatted as above. A total of two tables and/or figures are allowed. Submissions that exceed the word or figure/table limits will be considered a Research Report and billed accordingly.

Hypotheses

A hypothesis article should be a balanced and insightful consideration of a topic with novel hypotheses well presented and supported. The article should be prepared as a Research Report but without Methods or Results sections.

Book Reviews

Book reviews should be 750 words or less and without sections. While most reviews are commissioned, suggestions can be proposed to the Editor-in-Chief.

Letters to the Editor

Authors can submit comments of 1000 words or less to the Editor-in-Chief.

Commentaries 

Commentaries are usually commissioned and of at least 1000 words with an abstract and no other subdivisions.

REMEMBER TO INCLUDE

In cover letter:
Name, postal address, phone number, fax number and email address of the corresponding author.
- Name of an Associate Editor with expertise in the area of the study (if no Associate Editor is suitable, the Editorial Office will handle the submission).
- Statement that all authors have contributed to the work, agree with the presented findings, and that the work has not been published before nor is being considered for publication in another journal.
- A list of at least 4-6 potential reviewers knowledgeable in the area of the study and potential reviewer conflicts.
- Statement that procedures involving experiments on human subjects are done in accord with the ethical standards of the Committee on Human Experimentation of the institution in which the experiments were done or in accord with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975. 
- Statement that procedures involving experimentation on animal subjects are done in accord with either the guide of the institution in which the experiments were done, or with the National Research Council's guide for the care and use of laboratory animals.
- Statement of all financial and material support for this research and any potential conflicts.

In manuscript:
Compliance with guidelines on human experimentation as well as protocol approval by a local Institutional Review Board should be specified.
- Compliance with guidelines of animal experimentation as well as protocol approval by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee should be specified.
- Statement of all financial and material support for this research and any potential conflicts should also be clearly identified in the acknowledgement section.
- Manuscripts should be double spaced with 1" margins on all sides, including the abstract and references. Every page of the manuscript, including the title page, references, tables, etc., should include a page number centered at the bottom.
- Manuscripts must have an abstract (250 words or less) and 4-10 keywords.
- References should be cited in order of appearance with numbers between square brackets. All publications cited in the text should be presented in order of appearance in a list of references following the acknowledgments section of the manuscript and before the tables and/or figure legends.

Resubmissions

Resubmissions should include the manuscript number and a point-by-point response to the previous reviews in the cover letter. The point-by-point response can also be included at the beginning of the manuscript to maintain formatting.

Financial Disclosure

All affiliations with or financial involvement (e.g., employment, consultancies, honoraria, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, grants or patents received or pending, royalties) with any organization or entity with a financial interest in or in financial competition with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript are completely disclosed in the letter of submission.

All financial and material support for this research and work are clearly identified in the manuscript including listing of support specified in the letter of submission that might constitute or give the appearance of influencing the findings, based on the judgment of the Editor-in-Chief in consultation with the Associate Editor handling the review of the manuscript.

PROOFS

The corresponding author of an accepted article will receive the PDF proof within 2-3 weeks' time and is asked to check this proof carefully (the publisher will execute a cursory check only). Please be sure to return your corrections as quickly as possible to ensure a timely publication date. Corrections other than typesetter's errors should be avoided, so please make sure when you submit your final revised paper to the editorial office that it is proofread and final. Costs arising from excessive corrections will be charged to the authors. Once the author’s corrections or approval to the proof are received, the article is updated and directly published in final form into the journal’s running volume. After final publication corrections will no longer be able to be made. If a significant error is discovered after publication, the only option is to publish a separate Erratum, the production of which must first be evaluated by the publisher (editorial@iospress.com).

OPEN ACCESS

Papers in Nutrition and Healthy Aging are published open access. Each article will be freely available from the moment it is published. Note that only papers accepted for publication are subject to payment of an article processing charge of US$500 / EUR500 to publish under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license. Publishing under the CC BY 4.0 license is available at U$750 / EUR750.

How to order reprints or IOS Press books
If you wish to order reprints of an published article, please contact the publisher for a quotation. IOS Press, Fax: +31 20 6870019. Email: editorial@iospress.nl.

An author is entitled to 25% discount on IOS Press books. See Author's Discount (25%) on all IOS Press book publications.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright of your article
Authors submitting a manuscript do so on the understanding that they have read and agreed to the terms of the IOS Press Author Copyright Agreement.

Article sharing
Authors of journal articles are permitted to self-archive and share their work through institutional repositories, personal websites, and preprint servers. Authors have the right to use excerpts of their article in other works written by the authors themselves, provided that the original work is properly cited. The consent for sharing an article, in whole or in part, depends on the version of the article that is shared, where it is shared, and the copyright license under which the article is published. Please refer to the IOS Press Article Sharing Policy for further information.

Quoting from other publications
Authors, when quoting from someone else's work or when considering reproducing figures or tables from a book or journal article, should make sure that they are not infringing a copyright. Although in general authors may quote from other published works, permission should be obtained from the holder of the copyright if there will be substantial extracts or reproduction of tables, plates, or other figures. If the copyright holder is not the author of the quoted or reproduced material, it is recommended that the permission of the author should also be sought. Material in unpublished letters and manuscripts is also protected and must not be published unless permission has been obtained. Submission of a paper will be interpreted as a statement that the author has obtained all the necessary permission. A suitable acknowledgement of any borrowed material must always be made.
 
PROOFS & PURCHASES 
 
PDF Proofs
The corresponding author will receive a pdf proof and is asked to check this proof carefully (the publisher will execute a cursory check only). Corrections other than printer's errors, however, should be avoided. Costs arising from such corrections will be charged to the authors.
 

How to order reprints or IOS Press books
An order form for reprints will be provided along with the pdf proof. If you wish to order reprints of an earlier published article, please contact the publisher for a quotation. IOS Press, Fax: +31 20 6870019. Email: editorial@iospress.nl.

An author is entitled to 25 % discount on IOS Press books. See Author's Discount (25%) on all IOS Press book publications.

KUDOS

Authors of published articles (non-prepress, final articles) will be contacted by Kudos. Kudos is a service that helps researchers maximize the impact and visibility of their research. It allows authors to enrich their articles with lay metadata, add links to related materials and promote their articles through the Kudos system to a wider public. Authors will receive no more than three emails: one invitation and a maximum of two reminders to register for the service and link the published article to their profile. Using and registering for Kudos remains entirely optional. For more information, please have a look at our authors section.

HOW TO PROMOTE YOUR WORK

Would you like some pointers on how to help your research achieve a wider reach and greater impact? Please consult our Promotional Toolkit for Authors for tips.

Policy on Ethics

Nutrition and Healthy Aging is committed to the highest ethical standards and best practices in publishing and follows the code of conduct for Committee on Publication Ethics/DOAJ and the ICMJE. Any possible conflict of interest, financial or otherwise, of perceived relevance to the submitted work must be clearly indicated in the manuscript (for further details see http://www.icmje.org/icmje-recommendations.pdf). 

Nutrition and Healthy Aging affirms that misconduct, in the form of fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism, jeopardizes the success of the entire scientific endeavor. However, the primary responsibility for considering and resolving allegations of scientific misconduct must be pursued within the individual academic communities and institutions where the scientific work is carried out. Every author of articles or abstracts submitted for publication assumes full responsibility, within the limits of his or her professional competence, for the accuracy of the report. In the case of multiple-authored papers, each author should have made a significant intellectual or practical contribution to the scientific work. Authors submit articles with the understanding that reports must not have been submitted elsewhere.

Questions raised about the conduct of experiments or their presentation will be evaluated preliminarily by the Editors-in-Chief and, if appropriate, in consultation with the Associate Editor handling the review of the manuscript. If deemed appropriate, the matter will be referred to the institution where the scientific work in question was performed. The Journal expects that the matter would be reviewed in accordance with institutional procedures for handling allegations of misconduct. At all stages, every effort should be made to ensure that the process is fair and just, both for those who are accused of misconduct and for those who have raised the issue of scientific misconduct.

In the event that a published article or abstract is to be retracted, a statement of retraction will be published in Nutrition and Healthy Aging.

Policy on Use of Animals

Nutrition and Healthy Aging supports the appropriate and responsible use of animals as experimental subjects.

The U.S. Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (PHS Policy) and the National Institutes of Health Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (NIH Guide) should guide all animal research. Compliance with guidelines on animal experimentation as well as protocol approval by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee should be stated and the approval number must be provided in the Methods section of the article. 

We recommend following the ARRIVE reporting guidelines when documenting animal studies (PLoS Bio 8(6), e1000412, 2010).

Further guidance on animal research ethics is available from the International Association of Veterinary Editors’ Consensus Author Guidelines on Animal Ethics and Welfare (http://veteditors.org/consensus-author-guidelines-on-animal-ethics-and-welfare-for-editors).

Policy on Use of Human Subjects

Experiments involving human subjects must conform with the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (United States Office of Science and Technology Policy) and in the Declaration of Helsinki and be approved by a local Institutional Review Board. Compliance with the former and approval by the latter must be stated in the cover letter and the approval number must be provided in the Methods section of the article.

Informed consent
For research involving human subjects, including registry reviews and retrospective cohort studies for example, authors must state that informed signed consent has been obtained from all subjects or provide an explanation as to why consent was waived.

Policy on Conflicts of Interest

For Authors
Nutrition and Healthy Aging requires authors to declare all conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise, of relevance to the particular manuscript. All authors must separately be named in the Conflicts of Interest statement. If an author has no conflict of interest to declare, include this section with the statement “(Name) has no conflict of interest to report”.

We require that authors use the Conflicts of Interest Disclosure Form from the ICMJE is included in the submission (download it from the ICMJE website at: icmje.org/disclosure-of-interest) and that a section mentioning Conflicts of Interest per individual author is included in the submitted manuscript.

For Referees
Nutrition and Healthy Aging requires that referees with conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise, declare them when submitting their report and recuse themselves when there is a conflict that may impact a fair and impartial review.

Examples
Financial conflicts of interest:
These can include any financial relationship between the authors and any organization that may have a financial interest in their research or financial interests on the part of the authors themselves. This can include, but is not limited to, employment, stocks or shares, patents, research funding, travel or other expenses, lecture fees, or goods or services. Authors should disclose any such relationships: past 3 years, present or anticipated along with any role these organizations may have had in the design, execution or presentation of the study. These can also include financial interests on the part of the authors themselves, such as stocks or shares, patents, or other forms of financial gain.

Non-financial conflicts of interest:
These can include any relationship between the authors and any person or organization that could reasonably be seen to compromise (or impact) the impartiality of the authors of an article. This can include, but is not limited to benefits to relatives, close friends or associates, or organizations that the author has an unpaid relationship with (such as consulting or advisory roles, or providing administrative assistance).

Ethical considerations, compliance and protocol approval
Compliance with guidelines on human experimentation as well as protocol approval by a local Institutional Review Board should be stated and the approval number should be provided.

Clinical trials should include the full protocol as a supplement. Studies involving human subjects that are exempt from approval by an Institutional Review Board should mention this in an Ethical Considerations Statement. 

Policy on Data Sharing

We encourage authors to make their data publicly available. Supplementary data can be submitted with the manuscript, included within the manuscript after the Figures and Tables (or otherwise after the References). Each supplementary item should have a legend and should not exceed the file size of 10 MB. Supplemental videos can be submitted separately (see top of this page for submission guidelines of videos). A short description of the supplementary items should be included under the header of “Supplementary Material” within the manuscript before the “References”. Large datasets should be hosted on the author’s own or institute’s website or in an appropriate database, and should be properly cited within the manuscript.

Advertising Policy

Nutrition and Healthy Aging accepts digital and print advertisements for meetings, services and events of interest to the community. Pharmaceutical advertising is accepted.

Digital Advertising
Banner advertising is accepted for placement on https://www.iospress.nl/journal/nutrition-and-healthy-aging/  Multiple positions are available, and banners may appear in rotation with others running at the same time. Pricing is based on length of time, rather than number of impressions served.

The Nutrition and Healthy Aging Editorial Office reserves the right to reject advertising that is judged to be incompatible with the mission of the journal or in poor taste in general.

Please contact market@iospress.nl to discuss readership and reach, advertising opportunities, rates and specifications.

Please visit the IOS Press Authors page for further information.

Abstracted/Indexed in

Cabell's Directory
Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS)
DOAJ - Directory of Open Access Journals
EMCare
Food Science and Technology Abstracts
OA @ PubMed Central
PubsHub
Scopus

*PubMed Central deposits
This journal deposits open access articles in  PubMed Central (PMC) as part of the IOS Press Open Library but can only do so if the article received NIH funding or if any of the authors are employed at NIH or its associated partners. Please refer to the PMC Funder Deposit List at the NIH Public Access Policy for details.

Policy on Open Access/Article Charges

Open Access

Nutrition and Healthy Aging is a gold open access journal. This means that every article, is immediately, permanently, and openly available for readers to view, download, share, and reuse.

Authors are required to pay an open access fee of US$500 / €500 to publish under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license on acceptance for publication.

Publishing under the CC BY 4.0 license is available at US$750 / €750 (ex. VAT if applicable).

Authors who anticipate difficulties paying the article processing charge may appeal to the Editors-in-chief to discuss waiving the charge. Waivers are also available for corresponding authors from eligible countries as identified by Research4Life project. A fee waiver may also be available if your institution has a transformative agreement with IOS Press.

PubMed Central deposits

This journal deposits open access articles in PubMed Central (PMC) as part of the IOS Press Open Library but can only do so if the article received NIH funding or if any of the authors are NIH, or associated partners, employees. Please refer to the PMC Funder Deposit List at the NIH Public Access Policy for details.

Peer Review

Peer Review Process and Process for Appeals
Nutrition and Healthy Aging operates a rigorous, timely, blinded peer review process (with an option for double-blind if requested) by experts in the field. Please visit our reviewer guidelines for further information about how to conduct a review.

After automatic plagiarism screening through iThenticate, all submitted manuscripts are subjected to initial appraisal by the Editors-in-Chief. Manuscripts that are deemed unsuitable may be rejected without peer review by the Editors-in-Chief and/or the Associate Editors, and the author will be informed as soon as possible. Manuscripts that are deemed suitable for peer review are forwarded to an Associate Editor with expertise in that area who then recruits appropriate anonymous referees (a minimum of two) for confidential review.

Editors and reviewers are asked to excuse themselves from reviewing a submission if a conflict makes them unable to make an impartial scientific judgment or evaluation. Conflicts of interest include but are not limited to: collaboration with the authors in the past three years; any professional or financial affiliations that may be perceived as a conflict of interest; a history of personal differences with the author(s). When an Editorial Board Member is on the author list, they must declare this in the competing interests section in the submitted manuscript.

If they are an author, another editor will be assigned for overseeing peer review. These submissions are subject to the exact same review process as any other manuscript. Referee reports are then assessed by the Associate Editor, who makes a decision which is then subject to approval of the Editors-in-Chief. Once approved, this decision is then conveyed to the author along with the referee’s anonymized reports. The initial decision will be one of the following: rejection, acceptance without revision, or potentially acceptable after minor or major revisions. Revised manuscripts will be appraised by the Associate Editor, who may seek the opinion of referees (prior or new) before making a decision, which again is subject to approval of the Editors-in-Chief. Once approved, this decision is then conveyed to the author along with the anonymized referee’s reports.

Once accepted, manuscripts are normally published online without delay and appear in the next available print issue (published quarterly). The Editors-in-Chief have ultimate responsibility for what is published in the journal. Authors may appeal decisions by contacting the Editors-in-Chief (at editorial@iospress.com). Authors will be informed in writing of the result of their appeal.

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Sustainable Development Goals

The content of this journal relates to SDG:

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Visit the SDG page for more information.